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The Idioms Equivalence Contest

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  • The Idioms Equivalence Contest

    Hi all,

    Why don't we play with idioms? We give some idioms and the meaning in our native language and the others try to find an equivalence in ther own language. No rules; you can add new ones, answer the one that other people posted, etc.

    I start with three Spanish idioms:
    - Verle las orejas al lobo (to see wolf's ears). You say it when you feel a danger or a problem approaching.
    - Tener cara (to have face). You say it from someone with no shame for taking advantage of sb or sth.
    - Dormir la mona (to sleep the female monkey). You say it when someone sleeps because he has drunk too much.

    Equivalences in your languages?
    www.lingostan.com

  • #2
    - To feel it in your bones - We say this when there is something you expect to happen, usually negative but can also be positive.
    - To take the Mickey - This is also to make fun of someone, if someone is taking the Mickey out of you they are taking advantage or making fun of you.
    - To sleep like a log - This one is to sleep very heavily but in fact is not linked to alcohol. You could also say someone is "out cold".

    Okay! I'll take a turn.

    - To cut someone some slack - To give someone room for error or to go easy on someone.
    - To get something out of your system - To get rid of a bad feeling that you have been holding onto about someone or something.
    - The best of both worlds - To have the best of two different situations. To have no downside.

    Let's see what equivalences you have, this could be a really useful way to learn. Nice idea, Victor!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Zak View Post
      - To feel it in your bones - We say this when there is something you expect to happen, usually negative but can also be positive.
      - To take the Mickey - This is also to make fun of someone, if someone is taking the Mickey out of you they are taking advantage or making fun of you.
      - To sleep like a log - This one is to sleep very heavily but in fact is not linked to alcohol. You could also say someone is "out cold".

      Okay! I'll take a turn.

      - To cut someone some slack - To give someone room for error or to go easy on someone.
      - To get something out of your system - To get rid of a bad feeling that you have been holding onto about someone or something.
      - The best of both worlds - To have the best of two different situations. To have no downside.

      Let's see what equivalences you have, this could be a really useful way to learn. Nice idea, Victor!
      1, to feel it in your bones: could be, but verle las orejas al lobo implies something negative...
      2, to take the Mickey: as you explain it, I thinks is more "tomar por el pito del sereno", (to mock of sb, not to give importance to sb). Literally "to take by the night watchman whistle"

      My turn:
      -To cut someone some slack: tener manga ancha (my wife gave me this one!). Lit., "have a wide sleeve"
      -To get something out of your system: a otra cosa, mariposa. Lit., "to another thing, butterfly"
      -The best of both worlds: (Querer) estar al plato y a las tajadas Lit., "(to want) to be at dish and slices". This is more understood like a bad thing, to try to have the good things of two incompatible things.

      I'll wait to see if someone adds new ones, especially in other languages!
      www.lingostan.com

      Comment


      • #4
        One from me: "Raining cats and dogs" - raining heavily. You might also hear "pissing it down" but I'd advise against using it v- the language is regarded by many as impolite.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Laury Burr View Post
          "Raining cats and dogs"
          For that one we say in Spanish:
          -Está lloviendo a cántaros (It's raining by pitchers).
          -Están cayendo chuzos de punta (spikes by the sharp end are falling).

          www.lingostan.com

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          • #6
            Russian for that would be "Льет как из ведра" (it pours as if from a bucket)

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            • #7
              Some wonderful French "raining" phrases. "Il pleut à verse" is I think the most commonly heard - "It's raining in torrents". Also "il pleut des cordes" - it's raining ropes (or strings, take your choice). And the most horrific sounding - "il tombe des hallebardes" - halberds are falling (yes, I had to look that up. A halberd was a mediaeval weapon - a combined spear and axe!). Would defintely stay indoors...

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