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is this sentesnse right?

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  • is this sentesnse right?

    I want to buy the same clothes, the old one of which is worn-out. Or should i just split it into two sentenses as: i want to buy the same clothes. The old one is worn-out.

  • #2
    Hi shalibo. I'm afraid thsi won't do. "Clothes" is plural. In order to construct the sentence as you do, I'd have to specify which item of slothing you are actually looking for: a shirt, a pair of trowsers, a jacket, a fur-coat, etc... That done, I much prefer your second option. "I want to buy the same shirt. The old one is worn out". Or, better still, "I want to buy a shirt of the same kind. The old one is worn out".

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    • Irina Ponomareva
      Irina Ponomareva commented
      Editing a comment
      "I want to buy the same shirt, the old one of which is worn-out" somehow still sounds strange. The grammar is okay, but the words just don't go together well. I had to struggle to come up with a sentence, which would have the same structure, and yet make sense. The best I can do is, "We have just heard of the arrival of a new leader of the sect, the old one of which has been arrested for child abduction".

    • shalibo
      shalibo commented
      Editing a comment
      thank you so much for your patience. Your example means a great deal to me. I tried to google such gramma examples for hours but couldn't find one(i type "the old one of which". And all the results just focus on old one. maybe my keyword is wrong.). Sincerely, thanks for your time.

    • shalibo
      shalibo commented
      Editing a comment
      I think the weird part of the sentense is "the same". Actually, at first, i also feel strange to use "buy the same clothes"(clearly your "a shirt of same kind make much more sense.). Cause the same gives me the feeling that it's the same one. But i found examples like "i bought the same car as yours. i saw the same shoes in a shop last week." from Oxford dictionary. And i thought okay, maybe the same can also mean similar. But anyway, still weird. But your "of the same kind" definately is a revelation to me. Thanks a lot.

  • #3
    I learnt that there are such structures like "many of which, one of which, etc." But there are can't be adjective like old, young, in front of which. So i came up with the question as following:
    Is the structure correct: the +adjective(old, awesome, etc) one + of which adjective clause.
    Here, of which serves as the appositive of one. As in examples like:
    The question of when to leave never came up. the continent of Asia.

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    • #4
      I've long been in awe of Irina's understanding of the English language (my language) - she speaks and writes it better than many native Enfglish speakers! Just one correction though - it's "trousers" not "trowsers"!

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      • #5
        Oops! Thanks for the correction

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        • #6
          You can break it into two sentences. It sounds more natural that way. Or you can say it all as one sentence with a pause in between. For example...
          I want to buy the same clothes. The old are worn out.
          I want to but the same clothes, the old are worn out.
          Also, the term trousers would be something most likely used in the UK. In America it would be pants unless you were to go into detail on the type of pants.
          Hope that helps

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          • #7
            No I' sorry, Amanda, but speaking as a 68 year old Englishman I'm afraid neither version works well. Irina has the best options - I'd add another couple of solutions:
            My old clothes are worn out. I'd like to buy some new ones just like them.
            Or
            I'd like to buy some new clothes, just like the old ones that are worn out.

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