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  • Laury Burr
    started a topic Nessun Dorma

    Nessun Dorma

    Hopeully everybody - at least the football fans among you! - will recognise this as the name of a tenor aria, which is from the opera Turandot by that wonderful Italian composer Puccini. (Footballers will recognise it if they're old enough to have seen the 1990 Football World Cup, which was held in Italy, because the aria was the official "song" for the event, so at the time we heard it almost daily.)
    Well, this is my question, and it's addressed specifically to native Italian speakers - though of course any comments for anyone else will as always be welcome.
    At the end of the aria the singer sings "Vencedor, vencedor, vencedor" (victor, victor, victor - you can see its relevance to a football competition!), rising in pitch. Now, most tenors I've heard - and I've heard several (I'm a classical music nut) - sing just that, "vencedor, vencedor, vencedor". But Pavarotti - who sang the official World Cup performance - sang "vencedor, vencedor, venecedor" - an extra syllable. It irritates me every time I hear it - it seems wrong. It doesn't sound as though he was taking a breath, so WHY?
    I'd love an Italian's answer, please!

  • Laury Burr
    replied
    Ah, that sounds plausible - many thanks!

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  • Irina Ponomareva
    replied
    I've listened to it again, and I think I know what you mean. Pavarotti is playing with the N sound, so it gets more like n-n-n than a single n. That may sound a bit like an extra syllable, but technically it isn't because N is not a vowel. Well... singers do these things.

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  • Laury Burr
    replied
    Oh and when other s sing it all three sound the same!

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  • Laury Burr
    replied
    Hmm, I'm baffled - the third word is the same word as the first two yet sounds different to me! Anyway thanks for your comments guys!

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  • Irina Ponomareva
    replied
    I can't hear any extra syllable. Nessun Dorma is something I have heard a hundred times perhaps, all sorts of different versions sung by very different people, and I can't hear any difference between Pavarotti's pronunciation and everyone else's.

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  • Lingostan
    replied
    Only if I listen hard and after you told me "maybe" I can hear the extra syllabe and just in the second, but actually there is not, and on the third I hear nothing, that is just the way italian sounds to foreigners, so as a matter of fact many English natives says we italians add a vowel sound when speaking English but we hear nothing of that sort. Furthermore, in songs letters are more stretched, elongated, but definitely I would not say he is adding a letter.

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  • Laury Burr
    replied
    Update. Thanks for the youtunbes. I listened to the first one and although, of course, the text says "vincerò vincerò vincerò" if you listen to what he sings there's definitely the extra syllable the third time - and even a hint of an extra syllable in the second! So my question stands!!

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  • Laury Burr
    replied
    Thanks for the reply - I stand corrected! Obviously my infformation source that said "vencedor vencedor vencedor" was wrong (I always thought the first syllable sounded more like "vin" than "ven").
    So I'll rephrase the question. What do people think about Pavarotti singing "vincerò vincerò vinecerò" - he definitely sings an extra syllable!

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  • Lingostan
    replied
    Actually it does not say "vencedor" but "vincerò" (I shall win) and this is what I always heard, plus, have a look at this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ovcNw8xr64

    and in the text too there is "vincerò"

    http://www.angolotesti.it/L/testi_ca...ma_502457.html

    Leave a comment:

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